Events under 'Arts'
Monday, August 21, 2017

Event Name

Date

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines

World War I, fought from 1914-1918, was the modern world’s first international conflict. Approximately 11 million soldiers were killed, and the war's toll including civilian casualties exceeded 20 million. The United States, by declaration of President Woodrow Wilson, formally entered the war Apr. 6, 1917. By Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died as a result of the war. Of these, more than 1,600 were Knights of Columbus. Both the first and last American military officers to die during the war were K of C members.

In addition to Knights who served on the battlefield as soldiers, the Order was active in war relief efforts, managing highly successful fundraising drives and providing hospitality to servicemen in America and abroad through Knights of Columbus recreation centers known as “huts.”

The impact of World War I was felt for generations. Methods of warfare were forever altered. The map of Europe was completely redrawn at the conclusion of the war, and decisions that followed may be attributed to the start of World War II in 1939. No one was unaffected during this time period.

The Knights of Columbus Museum commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ participation in the war with an exhibition, World War I: Beyond the Front Lines (Apr. 6, 2017 – Dec. 30, 2018). The exhibition provides an historical retrospective of the war and includes interactives, images and artifacts from the Knights of Columbus Museum collection, Supreme Council archives and borrowed materials from private lenders and organizations. A series of WWI-related lectures and presentations will be offered throughout the course of the exhibition.

Monday, August 21, 2017
Every Day until December 30, 2018

Guilford Art Center Exhibition: Resident Potter, Monica Hewryk

Guilford Art Center is pleased to announce an exhibition of the ceramic work of Monica Hewryk, the Center’s Resident Potter since September, 2016.  The exhibition is on view in the gallery August 16 – September 3, with an opening reception on Friday, August 18 from 5-7 pm.  The reception is free and open to the public.  The gallery is also free and open to the public 7 days a week (Monday – Saturday 10am-4pm, Sunday 12-4pm).

Hewryk creates mainly sculptural works.  Her style is an amalgamation of her fascination with pushing the boundaries of construction, adding interesting textures, and throwing in a bit of whimsy.  She describes her work as “exploring the irony of pottery and playing with ideas potters would normally avoid, like creating a mug that would never hold water.  I try to accentuate these ironies in different recognizable forms, using a lot of color and movement.”

She has been the second person to serve in the Resident Potter position, and this exhibition is the culmination of her work during her time at the Center. In her capacity, Hewryk has been responsible for working with pottery students, overseeing the facility's studio practice times, and providing inspiration through her presence and her own creativity. The position is designed to provide the Resident with time and space to develop their own ceramic art while contributing to the workings of a communal pottery studio.  

Hewryk received her Bachelor of Arts from Central Connecticut State University, with a focus on ceramics, in 2014.

“This residency has given me the opportunity to be involved in an artistic community and environment where I can share my passion for clay with others,” says Hewryk.  “I’ve gained so much information from every experience and everyone I’ve met at GAC.  It’s a wonderful place to be inspired and to inspire others.”   

GAC’s ceramics studio offers classes for adults and children, Home School programs, weekend workshops, and summer classes for children. The studio is equipped with 12 wheels, a hand building table, 3 electric kilns, slab roller, extruder, outdoor downdraft gas kiln, raku kiln, and a glaze mixing room. Students may work with four different clay bodies, and a large selection of glazes.

For more information contact the Guilford Art Center at 203-453-5947 or www.guilfordartcenter.org.

Monday, August 21, 2017
Every Day until September 03, 2017

CAW’s Adventures in Art Exhibit

New Haven artist Noe Jimenez has spent the summer working with CAW's Young People's Department to create a collaborative installation. Noe's colorful paintings and sculptures were enlarged, reinvented, and altered by CAW students, who were invited into his artistic practice and given the freedom to "see art in a less precious way." The exhibit will open in mid-August and continue to transform throughout the month. Call CAW at 203-562-4927 for the hours the gallery will be open to see this exhibit. A closing ice cream reception will be held Sunday, September 10 from 2 pm - 4 pm.

Monday, August 21, 2017
Every Day until September 10, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours of Yale.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Monday, August 21, 2017 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Monday, August 21, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines

World War I, fought from 1914-1918, was the modern world’s first international conflict. Approximately 11 million soldiers were killed, and the war's toll including civilian casualties exceeded 20 million. The United States, by declaration of President Woodrow Wilson, formally entered the war Apr. 6, 1917. By Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died as a result of the war. Of these, more than 1,600 were Knights of Columbus. Both the first and last American military officers to die during the war were K of C members.

In addition to Knights who served on the battlefield as soldiers, the Order was active in war relief efforts, managing highly successful fundraising drives and providing hospitality to servicemen in America and abroad through Knights of Columbus recreation centers known as “huts.”

The impact of World War I was felt for generations. Methods of warfare were forever altered. The map of Europe was completely redrawn at the conclusion of the war, and decisions that followed may be attributed to the start of World War II in 1939. No one was unaffected during this time period.

The Knights of Columbus Museum commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ participation in the war with an exhibition, World War I: Beyond the Front Lines (Apr. 6, 2017 – Dec. 30, 2018). The exhibition provides an historical retrospective of the war and includes interactives, images and artifacts from the Knights of Columbus Museum collection, Supreme Council archives and borrowed materials from private lenders and organizations. A series of WWI-related lectures and presentations will be offered throughout the course of the exhibition.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Every Day until December 30, 2018

Guilford Art Center Exhibition: Resident Potter, Monica Hewryk

Guilford Art Center is pleased to announce an exhibition of the ceramic work of Monica Hewryk, the Center’s Resident Potter since September, 2016.  The exhibition is on view in the gallery August 16 – September 3, with an opening reception on Friday, August 18 from 5-7 pm.  The reception is free and open to the public.  The gallery is also free and open to the public 7 days a week (Monday – Saturday 10am-4pm, Sunday 12-4pm).

Hewryk creates mainly sculptural works.  Her style is an amalgamation of her fascination with pushing the boundaries of construction, adding interesting textures, and throwing in a bit of whimsy.  She describes her work as “exploring the irony of pottery and playing with ideas potters would normally avoid, like creating a mug that would never hold water.  I try to accentuate these ironies in different recognizable forms, using a lot of color and movement.”

She has been the second person to serve in the Resident Potter position, and this exhibition is the culmination of her work during her time at the Center. In her capacity, Hewryk has been responsible for working with pottery students, overseeing the facility's studio practice times, and providing inspiration through her presence and her own creativity. The position is designed to provide the Resident with time and space to develop their own ceramic art while contributing to the workings of a communal pottery studio.  

Hewryk received her Bachelor of Arts from Central Connecticut State University, with a focus on ceramics, in 2014.

“This residency has given me the opportunity to be involved in an artistic community and environment where I can share my passion for clay with others,” says Hewryk.  “I’ve gained so much information from every experience and everyone I’ve met at GAC.  It’s a wonderful place to be inspired and to inspire others.”   

GAC’s ceramics studio offers classes for adults and children, Home School programs, weekend workshops, and summer classes for children. The studio is equipped with 12 wheels, a hand building table, 3 electric kilns, slab roller, extruder, outdoor downdraft gas kiln, raku kiln, and a glaze mixing room. Students may work with four different clay bodies, and a large selection of glazes.

For more information contact the Guilford Art Center at 203-453-5947 or www.guilfordartcenter.org.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Every Day until September 03, 2017

CAW’s Adventures in Art Exhibit

New Haven artist Noe Jimenez has spent the summer working with CAW's Young People's Department to create a collaborative installation. Noe's colorful paintings and sculptures were enlarged, reinvented, and altered by CAW students, who were invited into his artistic practice and given the freedom to "see art in a less precious way." The exhibit will open in mid-August and continue to transform throughout the month. Call CAW at 203-562-4927 for the hours the gallery will be open to see this exhibit. A closing ice cream reception will be held Sunday, September 10 from 2 pm - 4 pm.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Every Day until September 10, 2017

Before the Event/After the Fact: Contemporary Perspectives on War

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

Before the Event/After the Fact offers a wide-ranging examination of the representation of war in contemporary photo-based practice, presenting works that depict training sites, combat zones, forensic reconstructions, and popular entertainment. The exhibition highlights conceptual, documentary, and architectural imaging techniques, investigating the visual relationship between staged images and real events, and between factual data and their digital representations. Photographs by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, An-My Lê, and Peter van Agtmael combine the apparent clarity of documentary imagery with the ambiguities of reality itself, while video installations by the filmmaker Harun Farocki and a digital animation and interactive work created by the interdisciplinary design studio SITU Research capture the present and future of digital-imaging technologies and their potential applications.
Exhibition organized by Judy Ditner, the Richard Benson Assistant Curator of Photography and Digital Media. Made possible by the Art Gallery Exhibition and Publication Fund.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Every Week until January 01, 2018

“Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

For more than three millennia, glassmakers in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East produced stunning vessels that employed a variety of manufacturing techniques and decorative schemes, combining an eye for beauty with virtuosic craftsmanship. Glassmaking—which originated in Mesopotamia in the third millennium B.C., underwent significant development in New Kingdom Egypt, and gained widespread popularity in the Roman and Byzantine Empires—evolved through a long process of cross-cultural circulation and borrowing as well as the innovations of individual workshops. Many trends came and went, while other changes revolutionized the industry and are still in use by glassmakers today. “Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery traces the technical evolution of ancient glassmaking and tells the story of how ancient glass was used, and by whom. The exhibition features approximately 130 vessels and fragments from the Gallery’s comprehensive collection of ancient glass, many of which have never before been on view, including pieces from Yale’s early 20th-century excavations at the sites of Dura-Europos (in present-day Syria) and Gerasa (now Jerash, Jordan). The objects on display open up a window onto craft production, daily life, religion, trade, and luxury in the ancient world.
Exhibition organized by Sara E. Cole, Ph.D. 2015, Curatorial Assistant, Antiquities Department, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and former Graduate Curatorial Intern, Department of Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery. Made possible by the Jane and Gerald Katcher Fund for Education; the Nolen-Bradley Family Fund for Education; and the John F. Wieland, Jr., B.A. 1988, Fund for Student Exhibitions.Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.
Exhibition organized by Frauke V. Josenhans, the Horace W. Goldsmith Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Made possible by the Richard Brown Baker, B.A. 1935, Collection Care and Enhancement Fund and the Société Anonyme Endowment Fund.

 

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Every Week until November 13, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours of Yale.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

YCBA: Spreading Canvas: Britain in the World

 

1080 Chapel St.
New Haven

203-432-2800, 877-BRIT-ART
www.yale.edu/ycba

Britain in the World

Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Sunday, December 31, 2017
The third phase of an important multiyear building conservation project has been completed, and visitors can now experience not only a renewed masterpiece of modern architecture by Louis I. Kahn but also a freshly reimagined installation of the Center’s collections. More than five hundred works, largely the gift of the institution’s founder, Paul Mellon (Yale College, Class of 1929), are on display in the newly restored and reconfigured galleries on the third and fourth floors.

Tracing the growth of a native British school of artists, the installation reveals how frequently the story of art in Britain focuses on a narrative of international exchange. The new arrangement addresses the impact of immigration and travel on British art and culture across the centuries, and the role that the arts have played in the history of Britain’s imperial vision, exploring the ways in which the perception of the British Empire influenced how Britons saw themselves and others. Featured in the display are the Netherlandish artists who provided the foundations of British art in the Tudor period (1485–1603), as well as the seventeenth-century Flemish artists Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck, the eighteenth-century Italian artist Canaletto, the German artist Johan Zoffany, and American artists John Singleton Copley and Benjamin West.

Many of the Center’s well-known treasures from the Paul Mellon Collection return to view in new and exciting juxtapositions, such as the works of George Stubbs, including his painting Pumpkin with a Stable-lad (1774); Joseph Wright of Derby’s The Blacksmith’s Shop (1771); J. M. W. Turner’s Dort or Dordrecht: The Dort packet-boat from Rotterdam becalmed (1818) and Staffa, Fingal’s Cave (1831–1832); and John Constable’s cloud studies (ca. 1821–1825) and Hadleigh Castle, The Mouth of the Thames—Morning after a Stormy Night (1828–1829). The display also includes important loans, from a portrait of the young Elizabeth I to paintings by Allan Ramsay (1713–1784) and John Linnell (1792–1882), as well as coins and medals from the collection of Stephen Scher.

Turner Bay, fourth floor, Yale Center for British Art, photograph by Richard Caspole
The installation is organized chronologically, focused around a number of themes. On the fourth floor, these include Becoming Great Britain (1550–1688); A Commercial Society (1688–1750); Rule Britannia? (1750–1775); Art and the Market (1775–1800); Revolution and Reaction (1800–1820); and The Age of Unease (1820–1850). The timeline continues on the third floor with A New Age (1850–1900); Going Modern, Being British (1900–1945); The End of Empire (1945–1979); and Postmodern Britain (1979–present). Masterworks from the collection, such as Frederic Leighton’s Mrs. James Guthrie (1865) and James McNeill Whistler’s Nocturne in Blue and Silver (1872–1878), are paired with major loans, including paintings by Sir John Everett Millais (1829–1896), Francis Bacon (1909–1992), Lucian Freud (1922–2011), and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (b. 1977), and a sculpture by Sir Antony Gormley (b. 1950). The third floor also contains works by Ben Nicholson (1894–1982), Henry Moore (1898–1986), and Maggi Hambling (b. 1945), among many others.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Every Week until January 01, 2018

Elm Shakespeare in the Park: The Tragedy of Romeo & Juliet

Elm Shakespeare Company announced today the 2017 Free Shakespeare in the Park production will be Shakespeare’s beloved and iconic story of ill fated love, The Tragedy of Romeo & Juliet. In addition to the traditional summer performances the company will present a series of community-wide events throughout the year focusing on the plays relevance today. "Here's much to do with hate, but more with love." – Romeo, Act 1, scene 1 The choice of Romeo & Juliet for this year’s summer season was made in response to the ngoing and unparalleled divisiveness in the nation. The company felt the play would serve its ongoing work to bring people together through Shakespeare to experience a shared humanity and build community.

Performances begin at 8pm Tuesday-Sunday evenings with picnicking and pre-show fun beginning at 6:30pm in Egerton Park at 75 Cliff St. New Haven.
Free for the Community, donations encouraged.

For additional information visit www.elmshakespeare.org or call 203-392-8882

Tuesday, August 22, 2017 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Every Week until September 04, 2017

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines

World War I, fought from 1914-1918, was the modern world’s first international conflict. Approximately 11 million soldiers were killed, and the war's toll including civilian casualties exceeded 20 million. The United States, by declaration of President Woodrow Wilson, formally entered the war Apr. 6, 1917. By Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died as a result of the war. Of these, more than 1,600 were Knights of Columbus. Both the first and last American military officers to die during the war were K of C members.

In addition to Knights who served on the battlefield as soldiers, the Order was active in war relief efforts, managing highly successful fundraising drives and providing hospitality to servicemen in America and abroad through Knights of Columbus recreation centers known as “huts.”

The impact of World War I was felt for generations. Methods of warfare were forever altered. The map of Europe was completely redrawn at the conclusion of the war, and decisions that followed may be attributed to the start of World War II in 1939. No one was unaffected during this time period.

The Knights of Columbus Museum commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ participation in the war with an exhibition, World War I: Beyond the Front Lines (Apr. 6, 2017 – Dec. 30, 2018). The exhibition provides an historical retrospective of the war and includes interactives, images and artifacts from the Knights of Columbus Museum collection, Supreme Council archives and borrowed materials from private lenders and organizations. A series of WWI-related lectures and presentations will be offered throughout the course of the exhibition.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Every Day until December 30, 2018

Guilford Art Center Exhibition: Resident Potter, Monica Hewryk

Guilford Art Center is pleased to announce an exhibition of the ceramic work of Monica Hewryk, the Center’s Resident Potter since September, 2016.  The exhibition is on view in the gallery August 16 – September 3, with an opening reception on Friday, August 18 from 5-7 pm.  The reception is free and open to the public.  The gallery is also free and open to the public 7 days a week (Monday – Saturday 10am-4pm, Sunday 12-4pm).

Hewryk creates mainly sculptural works.  Her style is an amalgamation of her fascination with pushing the boundaries of construction, adding interesting textures, and throwing in a bit of whimsy.  She describes her work as “exploring the irony of pottery and playing with ideas potters would normally avoid, like creating a mug that would never hold water.  I try to accentuate these ironies in different recognizable forms, using a lot of color and movement.”

She has been the second person to serve in the Resident Potter position, and this exhibition is the culmination of her work during her time at the Center. In her capacity, Hewryk has been responsible for working with pottery students, overseeing the facility's studio practice times, and providing inspiration through her presence and her own creativity. The position is designed to provide the Resident with time and space to develop their own ceramic art while contributing to the workings of a communal pottery studio.  

Hewryk received her Bachelor of Arts from Central Connecticut State University, with a focus on ceramics, in 2014.

“This residency has given me the opportunity to be involved in an artistic community and environment where I can share my passion for clay with others,” says Hewryk.  “I’ve gained so much information from every experience and everyone I’ve met at GAC.  It’s a wonderful place to be inspired and to inspire others.”   

GAC’s ceramics studio offers classes for adults and children, Home School programs, weekend workshops, and summer classes for children. The studio is equipped with 12 wheels, a hand building table, 3 electric kilns, slab roller, extruder, outdoor downdraft gas kiln, raku kiln, and a glaze mixing room. Students may work with four different clay bodies, and a large selection of glazes.

For more information contact the Guilford Art Center at 203-453-5947 or www.guilfordartcenter.org.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Every Day until September 03, 2017

CAW’s Adventures in Art Exhibit

New Haven artist Noe Jimenez has spent the summer working with CAW's Young People's Department to create a collaborative installation. Noe's colorful paintings and sculptures were enlarged, reinvented, and altered by CAW students, who were invited into his artistic practice and given the freedom to "see art in a less precious way." The exhibit will open in mid-August and continue to transform throughout the month. Call CAW at 203-562-4927 for the hours the gallery will be open to see this exhibit. A closing ice cream reception will be held Sunday, September 10 from 2 pm - 4 pm.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Every Day until September 10, 2017

Before the Event/After the Fact: Contemporary Perspectives on War

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

Before the Event/After the Fact offers a wide-ranging examination of the representation of war in contemporary photo-based practice, presenting works that depict training sites, combat zones, forensic reconstructions, and popular entertainment. The exhibition highlights conceptual, documentary, and architectural imaging techniques, investigating the visual relationship between staged images and real events, and between factual data and their digital representations. Photographs by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, An-My Lê, and Peter van Agtmael combine the apparent clarity of documentary imagery with the ambiguities of reality itself, while video installations by the filmmaker Harun Farocki and a digital animation and interactive work created by the interdisciplinary design studio SITU Research capture the present and future of digital-imaging technologies and their potential applications.
Exhibition organized by Judy Ditner, the Richard Benson Assistant Curator of Photography and Digital Media. Made possible by the Art Gallery Exhibition and Publication Fund.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Every Week until January 01, 2018

“Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

For more than three millennia, glassmakers in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East produced stunning vessels that employed a variety of manufacturing techniques and decorative schemes, combining an eye for beauty with virtuosic craftsmanship. Glassmaking—which originated in Mesopotamia in the third millennium B.C., underwent significant development in New Kingdom Egypt, and gained widespread popularity in the Roman and Byzantine Empires—evolved through a long process of cross-cultural circulation and borrowing as well as the innovations of individual workshops. Many trends came and went, while other changes revolutionized the industry and are still in use by glassmakers today. “Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery traces the technical evolution of ancient glassmaking and tells the story of how ancient glass was used, and by whom. The exhibition features approximately 130 vessels and fragments from the Gallery’s comprehensive collection of ancient glass, many of which have never before been on view, including pieces from Yale’s early 20th-century excavations at the sites of Dura-Europos (in present-day Syria) and Gerasa (now Jerash, Jordan). The objects on display open up a window onto craft production, daily life, religion, trade, and luxury in the ancient world.
Exhibition organized by Sara E. Cole, Ph.D. 2015, Curatorial Assistant, Antiquities Department, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and former Graduate Curatorial Intern, Department of Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery. Made possible by the Jane and Gerald Katcher Fund for Education; the Nolen-Bradley Family Fund for Education; and the John F. Wieland, Jr., B.A. 1988, Fund for Student Exhibitions.Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.
Exhibition organized by Frauke V. Josenhans, the Horace W. Goldsmith Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Made possible by the Richard Brown Baker, B.A. 1935, Collection Care and Enhancement Fund and the Société Anonyme Endowment Fund.

 

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 9:00 am - 10:00 am
Every Week until November 13, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours of Yale.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

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