Events under 'Arts'
Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Event Name

Date

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines

World War I, fought from 1914-1918, was the modern world’s first international conflict. Approximately 11 million soldiers were killed, and the war's toll including civilian casualties exceeded 20 million. The United States, by declaration of President Woodrow Wilson, formally entered the war Apr. 6, 1917. By Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died as a result of the war. Of these, more than 1,600 were Knights of Columbus. Both the first and last American military officers to die during the war were K of C members.

In addition to Knights who served on the battlefield as soldiers, the Order was active in war relief efforts, managing highly successful fundraising drives and providing hospitality to servicemen in America and abroad through Knights of Columbus recreation centers known as “huts.”

The impact of World War I was felt for generations. Methods of warfare were forever altered. The map of Europe was completely redrawn at the conclusion of the war, and decisions that followed may be attributed to the start of World War II in 1939. No one was unaffected during this time period.

The Knights of Columbus Museum commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ participation in the war with an exhibition, World War I: Beyond the Front Lines (Apr. 6, 2017 – Dec. 30, 2018). The exhibition provides an historical retrospective of the war and includes interactives, images and artifacts from the Knights of Columbus Museum collection, Supreme Council archives and borrowed materials from private lenders and organizations. A series of WWI-related lectures and presentations will be offered throughout the course of the exhibition.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Day until December 30, 2018

Before the Event/After the Fact: Contemporary Perspectives on War

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

Before the Event/After the Fact offers a wide-ranging examination of the representation of war in contemporary photo-based practice, presenting works that depict training sites, combat zones, forensic reconstructions, and popular entertainment. The exhibition highlights conceptual, documentary, and architectural imaging techniques, investigating the visual relationship between staged images and real events, and between factual data and their digital representations. Photographs by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, An-My Lê, and Peter van Agtmael combine the apparent clarity of documentary imagery with the ambiguities of reality itself, while video installations by the filmmaker Harun Farocki and a digital animation and interactive work created by the interdisciplinary design studio SITU Research capture the present and future of digital-imaging technologies and their potential applications.
Exhibition organized by Judy Ditner, the Richard Benson Assistant Curator of Photography and Digital Media. Made possible by the Art Gallery Exhibition and Publication Fund.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Week until January 01, 2018

“Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

For more than three millennia, glassmakers in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East produced stunning vessels that employed a variety of manufacturing techniques and decorative schemes, combining an eye for beauty with virtuosic craftsmanship. Glassmaking—which originated in Mesopotamia in the third millennium B.C., underwent significant development in New Kingdom Egypt, and gained widespread popularity in the Roman and Byzantine Empires—evolved through a long process of cross-cultural circulation and borrowing as well as the innovations of individual workshops. Many trends came and went, while other changes revolutionized the industry and are still in use by glassmakers today. “Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery traces the technical evolution of ancient glassmaking and tells the story of how ancient glass was used, and by whom. The exhibition features approximately 130 vessels and fragments from the Gallery’s comprehensive collection of ancient glass, many of which have never before been on view, including pieces from Yale’s early 20th-century excavations at the sites of Dura-Europos (in present-day Syria) and Gerasa (now Jerash, Jordan). The objects on display open up a window onto craft production, daily life, religion, trade, and luxury in the ancient world.
Exhibition organized by Sara E. Cole, Ph.D. 2015, Curatorial Assistant, Antiquities Department, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and former Graduate Curatorial Intern, Department of Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery. Made possible by the Jane and Gerald Katcher Fund for Education; the Nolen-Bradley Family Fund for Education; and the John F. Wieland, Jr., B.A. 1988, Fund for Student Exhibitions.Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.
Exhibition organized by Frauke V. Josenhans, the Horace W. Goldsmith Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Made possible by the Richard Brown Baker, B.A. 1935, Collection Care and Enhancement Fund and the Société Anonyme Endowment Fund.

 

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Week until November 13, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours of Yale.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

An Artist for Conservation: The Paintings of Albert Earl Gilbert

Featuring more than 25 original pieces, An Artist for Conservation explores the beauty and majesty of birds, from hawks to hornbills, through the eyes of renowned artist Albert Earl Gilbert. Regarded today as one of the world’s premier wildlife artists, Gilbert began drawing as a child, crayon in hand, depicting lions, tigers, bears, and birds. He spent much of his career conducting fieldwork across the globe—from Africa to Australia—observing and sketching rare and colorful tropical birds in their native habitat. In 1977 Al’s painting of a hooded merganser won the 45th Federal Duck Stamp Contest. Sales of this stamp generated well over 11 million dollars—all of which supported the Department of Interior’s Federal Duck Stamp program to acquire wetland habitat and protect not only waterfowl but all other wildlife. At Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, 170 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday noon-5.

 

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Day until April 15, 2018

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope
September 1–December 31, 2017
1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600
www.artgallery.yale.edu

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Week until January 01, 2018

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Long Wharf Theatre: FIREFLIES

222 Sargent Dr. New Haven 203-787-4282 www.longwharf.org 

See website for times.

FIREFLIES
A WORLD PREMIERE ROMANCE
By Matthew Barber

Directed by Gordon Edelstein
OCT 11 - NOV 5, 2017

Eleanor Bannister, a retired schoolteacher, lives a sleepy life in tiny Groverdell, Texas. She’s taught almost everyone in town. She even has her own shelf at the town library – “Miss Bannister Recommends.” She is, in a word, orderly. Until one day, when walking alone through the brambles barefoot and in her nightgown, she encounters Abel Brown, a mysterious drifter. Brown has been wandering around town, looking for houses to fix and, rumor has it, widows to talk to. Brown is nothing but a drifter, but despite their obvious differences, Eleanor and Abel find themselves drawn to each other. This beautiful new romance by Matthew Barber, Tony Award-nominated author of Enchanted April, shows that connection can be found in the unlikeliest of places and in the unlikeliest of ways.

 

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Day until November 05, 2017

Rags

Welcome to the new world! Fresh from Ellis Island, a young mother and her son search for a new life and a sense of home as the 20th century beckons. The streets of Manhattan’s Lower East Side may not be paved with gold, but they echo with the music of opportunity, optimism and hope. A ravishing score by the songwriters of Wicked and Annie colors a sweeping saga of America’s immigrant past. Celebrate our rich roots in Goodspeed’s new adaptation of a neglected masterpiece of the musical theatre.

http://goodspeed.org/

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Every Day until December 10, 2018

World War I: Beyond the Front Lines

World War I, fought from 1914-1918, was the modern world’s first international conflict. Approximately 11 million soldiers were killed, and the war's toll including civilian casualties exceeded 20 million. The United States, by declaration of President Woodrow Wilson, formally entered the war Apr. 6, 1917. By Armistice Day, Nov. 11, 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died as a result of the war. Of these, more than 1,600 were Knights of Columbus. Both the first and last American military officers to die during the war were K of C members.

In addition to Knights who served on the battlefield as soldiers, the Order was active in war relief efforts, managing highly successful fundraising drives and providing hospitality to servicemen in America and abroad through Knights of Columbus recreation centers known as “huts.”

The impact of World War I was felt for generations. Methods of warfare were forever altered. The map of Europe was completely redrawn at the conclusion of the war, and decisions that followed may be attributed to the start of World War II in 1939. No one was unaffected during this time period.

The Knights of Columbus Museum commemorates the 100th anniversary of the United States’ participation in the war with an exhibition, World War I: Beyond the Front Lines (Apr. 6, 2017 – Dec. 30, 2018). The exhibition provides an historical retrospective of the war and includes interactives, images and artifacts from the Knights of Columbus Museum collection, Supreme Council archives and borrowed materials from private lenders and organizations. A series of WWI-related lectures and presentations will be offered throughout the course of the exhibition.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Day until December 30, 2018

Before the Event/After the Fact: Contemporary Perspectives on War

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

Before the Event/After the Fact offers a wide-ranging examination of the representation of war in contemporary photo-based practice, presenting works that depict training sites, combat zones, forensic reconstructions, and popular entertainment. The exhibition highlights conceptual, documentary, and architectural imaging techniques, investigating the visual relationship between staged images and real events, and between factual data and their digital representations. Photographs by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, An-My Lê, and Peter van Agtmael combine the apparent clarity of documentary imagery with the ambiguities of reality itself, while video installations by the filmmaker Harun Farocki and a digital animation and interactive work created by the interdisciplinary design studio SITU Research capture the present and future of digital-imaging technologies and their potential applications.
Exhibition organized by Judy Ditner, the Richard Benson Assistant Curator of Photography and Digital Media. Made possible by the Art Gallery Exhibition and Publication Fund.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Week until January 01, 2018

“Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery

1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600

For more than three millennia, glassmakers in the ancient Mediterranean and Near East produced stunning vessels that employed a variety of manufacturing techniques and decorative schemes, combining an eye for beauty with virtuosic craftsmanship. Glassmaking—which originated in Mesopotamia in the third millennium B.C., underwent significant development in New Kingdom Egypt, and gained widespread popularity in the Roman and Byzantine Empires—evolved through a long process of cross-cultural circulation and borrowing as well as the innovations of individual workshops. Many trends came and went, while other changes revolutionized the industry and are still in use by glassmakers today. “Drink That You May Live”: Ancient Glass from the Yale University Art Gallery traces the technical evolution of ancient glassmaking and tells the story of how ancient glass was used, and by whom. The exhibition features approximately 130 vessels and fragments from the Gallery’s comprehensive collection of ancient glass, many of which have never before been on view, including pieces from Yale’s early 20th-century excavations at the sites of Dura-Europos (in present-day Syria) and Gerasa (now Jerash, Jordan). The objects on display open up a window onto craft production, daily life, religion, trade, and luxury in the ancient world.
Exhibition organized by Sara E. Cole, Ph.D. 2015, Curatorial Assistant, Antiquities Department, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, and former Graduate Curatorial Intern, Department of Ancient Art, Yale University Art Gallery. Made possible by the Jane and Gerald Katcher Fund for Education; the Nolen-Bradley Family Fund for Education; and the John F. Wieland, Jr., B.A. 1988, Fund for Student Exhibitions.Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.
Exhibition organized by Frauke V. Josenhans, the Horace W. Goldsmith Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art. Made possible by the Richard Brown Baker, B.A. 1935, Collection Care and Enhancement Fund and the Société Anonyme Endowment Fund.

 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Week until November 13, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours of Yale.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

An Artist for Conservation: The Paintings of Albert Earl Gilbert

Featuring more than 25 original pieces, An Artist for Conservation explores the beauty and majesty of birds, from hawks to hornbills, through the eyes of renowned artist Albert Earl Gilbert. Regarded today as one of the world’s premier wildlife artists, Gilbert began drawing as a child, crayon in hand, depicting lions, tigers, bears, and birds. He spent much of his career conducting fieldwork across the globe—from Africa to Australia—observing and sketching rare and colorful tropical birds in their native habitat. In 1977 Al’s painting of a hooded merganser won the 45th Federal Duck Stamp Contest. Sales of this stamp generated well over 11 million dollars—all of which supported the Department of Interior’s Federal Duck Stamp program to acquire wetland habitat and protect not only waterfowl but all other wildlife. At Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, 170 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday noon-5.

 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Day until April 15, 2018

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope
September 1–December 31, 2017
1111 Chapel St.
New Haven
203-432-0600
www.artgallery.yale.edu

Artists in Exile: Expressions of Loss and Hope presents an innovative approach to the theme of exile, considering artists who left their country of birth, or their adopted home, for a variety of reasons—including discrimination, war, and genocide—from the 19th century to the present day. The exhibition explores exile as not only a mental or physical state but also a catalyst for creativity; indeed, for many artists, separation from the familiar, either willing or unwilling, inspired innovations in form and technique. The installation features works by such well-known European artists as Jacques-Louis David, Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Josef Albers, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, George Grosz, and Max Beckmann, while also advocating a more global perspective through works by Arshile Gorky, Matta, Elizabeth Catlett, Ana Mendieta, Mu Xin, Shirin Neshat, An-My Lê, Mona Hatoum, and Ahmed Alsoudani and giving notable attention to female artists. The majority of the objects on display are drawn from the Yale University Art Gallery’s encyclopedic collection, enriched by the addition of key loans from other institutions and private collections.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Week until January 01, 2018

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Yale University Campus Tour

The center welcomes visitors and offers daily guided tours.  Groups of 10 or more require a reservation.  Architecture tours and foreign language tours are available for a fee by appointment.  Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Weekends: 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Tours: Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Weekends: 1:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving and Dec 23 - Jan 1.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Every Week until December 23, 2017

Long Wharf Theatre: FIREFLIES

222 Sargent Dr. New Haven 203-787-4282 www.longwharf.org 

See website for times.

FIREFLIES
A WORLD PREMIERE ROMANCE
By Matthew Barber

Directed by Gordon Edelstein
OCT 11 - NOV 5, 2017

Eleanor Bannister, a retired schoolteacher, lives a sleepy life in tiny Groverdell, Texas. She’s taught almost everyone in town. She even has her own shelf at the town library – “Miss Bannister Recommends.” She is, in a word, orderly. Until one day, when walking alone through the brambles barefoot and in her nightgown, she encounters Abel Brown, a mysterious drifter. Brown has been wandering around town, looking for houses to fix and, rumor has it, widows to talk to. Brown is nothing but a drifter, but despite their obvious differences, Eleanor and Abel find themselves drawn to each other. This beautiful new romance by Matthew Barber, Tony Award-nominated author of Enchanted April, shows that connection can be found in the unlikeliest of places and in the unlikeliest of ways.

 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Day until November 05, 2017

Rags

Welcome to the new world! Fresh from Ellis Island, a young mother and her son search for a new life and a sense of home as the 20th century beckons. The streets of Manhattan’s Lower East Side may not be paved with gold, but they echo with the music of opportunity, optimism and hope. A ravishing score by the songwriters of Wicked and Annie colors a sweeping saga of America’s immigrant past. Celebrate our rich roots in Goodspeed’s new adaptation of a neglected masterpiece of the musical theatre.

http://goodspeed.org/

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Every Day until December 10, 2018

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